Spaghetti tag

Updated from the original post on Friday, September 25, 2020: Some of the salmon in this year’s return are sporting a highly visible plastic string, telling any observer there is something important about this fish. In particular, this Chinook was captured at the Chittenden Locks by the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, equipped with an internal tag (acoustic transmitter) that will ping multiple receivers in fixed positions as the fish makes it way from the Locks, through the Lake Washington Ship Canal, Lake Washington, the Sammamish River, Lake Sammamish, and finally, Issaquah Creek.  The main purpose of tagging the hatchery fish is to document survival during their migration from the Locks to the hatchery. The last couple of years we have noticed a difference in numbers between the Lock counts and what shows up at the hatchery so we are trying to find out if and where we are losing fish.

Muckleshoot biologists, Ava Fuller and Jesse Nitz tagging a hatchery Chinook at the Locks. Photo taken by Eric Warner (Muckleshoot Indian Tribe)
Muckleshoot biologists, Ava Fuller and Jesse Nitz tagging a hatchery Chinook at the Locks. Photo taken by Eric Warner (Muckleshoot Indian Tribe)

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